ti fanm kreyòl

i am unapologetically haitian, womanist, and human.
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rafaadsan:

samiratastic:

pharmawhat:

Now this here folks is where you find humanity.

Sorry, I have to share the pictures and letters

Children that have spent most or all of their existence in a camp can have so much hope, kindness and intelligence.  

this hatter my heart to pieces. hasbi allah 

(via madanmsila)

thechanelmuse:

Divided Family: Through Music, Cubans Trace Their Roots To Sierra Leone

It is often said that music has the power to bring people together. That sentiment is definitely an understatement when it comes to the Afro-Cubans community Ganga-Longoba of Perico. 

Cuba’s Ganga people have been singing the same African chants for generations, but it wasn’t until an Australian researcher took interest in the songs, that they were able to trace their chants to a remote village in Sierra Leone, 170 years after the slave trade.

“When I first filmed the Ganga-Longoba, I believed their ceremonies were a mixture of many different ethnic groups,” says historian Emma Christopher, of Sydney University. “I had no idea that a large number of Ganga songs would come from just one village. I think that’s extremely unusual,” she says.

After tracing their roots back to Sierra Leone, four Cubans made the trip to the African country to delve more into their history. Christopher captured the moment for the documentary They Are We.

"Cuba was cut off at a time when other nations in the Americas were going through black pride and fighting for some justice for what happened to their ancestors," says Dr. Christopher, who points out that the island’s 1959 revolution declared racism ‘solved’. That left a lot of Afro-Cubans adrift, not knowing how to celebrate where they came from and be proud of it," she says.

Whilst many Cubans of Spanish descent have rushed to seek out their ancestry—and passports—Afro-Cubans have been far less anxious to do the same. Organizing a reunion for the divided “family” wasn’t easy given restrictions on traveling from Cuba at the time, and limited resources. But eventually, four Cubans did make their ancestors’ voyage in reverse - to Sierra Leone.

“When I opened my mouth to sing, they just stood there staring,” Elvira Fumero recalls of her arrival in Mokpangumba. “Then it was like an explosion. They started to sing the responses, and dance with me. And I knew then that this was where the Ganga came from,” she says, smiling.

For Alfredo Duquesne, visiting Sierra Leone changed everything.

"It was as if I’d just left the previous weekend. I touched the soil and thought: ‘This is it. I’ve come back,’" he says, describing himself now as ‘at peace’. "At last I know where I come from," Alfredo says. "I’m not a stranger anymore."

Source

(via universalayititoma)

artdream:

#ayiti

alloayiti:

Lu d’un trait.

Merci Léonard !

(via universalayititoma)

lostinurbanism:

Alex Webb, Haiti (1987)

(via alexbelvocal)

Baby Williams sisters!!!

(via thegreenteacrimewavestudio)

yagazieemezi:

Beautiful Ghana

Images collected by Lars during a trip to Kumasi.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via 92here)

abiblr:

fucky-str1pe:

themadfangirl:

kieradoe:

whatsortofamandoesntcarryatrowel:

Dad: Why do you think they do that?
Girl: Because the companies who make these try to trick the girls into buying the pink stuff instead of stuff boys want to buy.
[x]

that awkward moment when a child understands the harm of forcing gender roles better than most grown male politicians.

Always reblog.

I’m surprised that I haven’t reblogged this, to be honest.

I love that last gif.  She looks so frustrated.  Like “Um, hello, obviously girls and boys can like anything why doesn’t anybody get that???”

She does have a point though..

Kids who are smarter than adults though.

(via negritaaa)

cultureunseen:

François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture, also Toussaint L’Ouverture, Toussaint-Louverture, Toussaint Bréda, nicknamed The Black Napoleon, was the leader of the Haitian Revolution.

Our President for Life arrived on May 20, 1743 and departed on April 7, 1803.

(via lunionsuite)

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - April 17, 1825 -Haiti settles indemnity with Charles X (top photo) in exchange for recognition.

While Haitian revolutionaries assumed authority over the island as of late November 1803, the former metropole never recognized the gesture and Haiti was still referred to as Saint-Domingue.

* Though the idea of an indemnity came from Alexandre Pétion, in hopes of reaching a settlement with France and no longer fearing for Haiti’s sovereignty, the question was eventually settled with his successor, Jean-Pierre Boyer (bottom photo). Indeed, in exchange for irrevocable recognition, Haiti agreed to a 150M francs sum (by 1789 values), to be payed in 5 instalments of 30M each. The settlement also included preferential treatment for France in all trade questions (i.e. 50% reduction in tariffs on French importants).  

The indemnity placed Boyer (and all subsequent governments) in a delicate situation. Through the Haitian government enjoyed annual revenues of 15M francs, even if it assumed payements for the next 10 years (to reach 150M), this left nothing for defence, infrastructure, education, or any other domestic concerns. Perhaps realizing this, Boyer issued a new Rural Code to raise agricultural production at the great detriment of labourers, (this, in part, help explain his decline in both in Haiti and by then the unified Dominican Republic).

Haiti (clearly unable to pay) defected its first payement and ironically began contracting loans from French banks to meet the French government’s demands. When it became clear that the Haitian government could simply not absorb this debt, Louis-Philippe (July Monarchy) reduced the sum to 90M, but maintained advantages trade tariffs with France. 

Ironically, the measure that was suppose to bring Haiti to full sovereignty only accelerated the process of a neo-colonial relationship with France, other European banks, and increasingly the United States. The state of affair was worsen by the later 19th century, when political instability and local rivalries made it impossible for most governments to assume power long enough to reverse the trend.  

French, Haitian and other historians disagree as to the actual year of the indemnity’s resolution. While most accept that by 1888, Haiti had payed most of the 1838 agreement, some argue that the indemnity question was finally settled in the 1930s with Sténio Vincent’s administration (because new loans related to the indemnity were taken up on top of existing loans for development and infrastructure). Other historians disagree and maintain that it was finalized in 1946, when all interests on loans were payed off with president Dumarsais Estimé. 

(Source) (Source) (Source)

lunionsuite:

Did you know?

(via dimwen)

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - April 21, 1971- Death of Haitian president and dictator, François Duvalier.

While some historians debate whether Duvalier (left) actually died on this date (some believing he may have died a few days before), ultimately, this changed very little in Haiti’s political structure as his son Jean-Claude Duvalier (right) was chosen to succeed him. 

Menm kout baton an.

haitianhistory:


Rare photo of Madame Masséna Peralte, circa 1936. CIDIHCA Archives. Madame Peralte was Charlemagne Peralte’s mother, the famous Cacos leader opposed to the American Marine Occupation (1915-1934). 

While a law already existed in Haitian cannons to that effect (but had rarely been deployed to the point of having been forgotten by many), in 1916, the Americans re-instituted the corvée, in order to build roads that would facilitate mouvements for the Marines. In practice, the Marines would force every Haitian on chosen locations to work on specific infrastructure projects for that day. Haitian folklore suggests that Prelate’s own mother (who was already an aged lady by this time) had been walking one day when she was taken with a group of Haitians to work on a construction field. This would have in turn enraged (and humiliated) Peralte very deeply. (Source) (Source)

haitianhistory:

Rare photo of Madame Masséna Peralte, circa 1936. CIDIHCA Archives. Madame Peralte was Charlemagne Peralte’s mother, the famous Cacos leader opposed to the American Marine Occupation (1915-1934). 

While a law already existed in Haitian cannons to that effect (but had rarely been deployed to the point of having been forgotten by many), in 1916, the Americans re-instituted the corvée, in order to build roads that would facilitate mouvements for the Marines. In practice, the Marines would force every Haitian on chosen locations to work on specific infrastructure projects for that day. Haitian folklore suggests that Prelate’s own mother (who was already an aged lady by this time) had been walking one day when she was taken with a group of Haitians to work on a construction field. This would have in turn enraged (and humiliated) Peralte very deeply. (Source) (Source)

(via black-culture)

Various Haitian Generals in their military uniform, 1860-1912. CIDIHCA Archives.

p-funkearthtour:

Rara, Haiti (2005-2006) by Phyllis Galembo

From Wikipedia:

Rara music is a Lenten processional music with strong ties to the Vodou religious tradition. It has been commonly confused with Haitian Carnival since both celebrations involve large groups of dancing revelers in the streets. Rara is performed between Ash Wednesday (the day after Carnival ends) until Easter Sunday (or Easter Monday in some parts of Haiti.) Rara bands roam the streets performing religious ceremonies as part of their ritual obligations to the “lwa” or spirits of Haitian Voodoo.

The songs are always performed in Haitian Kreyòl and typically celebrate the African ancestry of the Afro-Haïtian masses. Rara in Haiti is often used for political purposes, with candidates commissioning songs praising them and their campaigns. Rara lyrics also often address difficult issues, such as political oppression or poverty. Consequently, rara groups and other musicians have been banned from performing and even forced into exile—most notably, folk singer Manno Charlemagne who later returned to Haïti and was elected mayor of Port-au-Prince in the 1990s.

(via tifanmkreyol)